How To Have Fun While Staying Safe On St. Patrick’s Day 

Saint Patrick's Day PartySt. Patrick’s Day is right around the corner and most cities have annual parades to celebrate with traditional Irish food, events, and specialty drinks. In fact, Buffalo has its own St. Patrick’s Day parade with bands, dancers, and entertainment for everyone to enjoy. While this is always a fun time to celebrate with friends and family, this is also a day that invites the potential of excess drinking. The last thing you’ll want on a fun day of celebrating is to be involved in an accident that could have been prevented, so from our team at The O’Brien Law Firm, we hope you have a safe holiday weekend by following these tips. 

Plan Ahead 

If you know you’re going to be partaking in drinking a traditional green beer or Irish whiskey, you should do so responsibly. Moreover, keep in mind that police officers will be on the lookout for drivers under the influence and people that may have had too much to drink. Knowing what to expect and planning ahead will allow you to have a good time while still being safe. 

When you know you’re going to drink: 

  • Have a designated driver that will refrain from drinking to take you home  
  • Call a taxi 
  • Stay at a hotel close by to walk back to
  • Limit and pace yourself 
  • Stay hydrated by drinking water 

Crowds 

Events usually bring in large crowds ready to celebrate and those people can be rambunctious. Crowds of people bring in the potential that you may trip, slip, and/or fall due to the negligence of another or business establishment. Furthermore, crowds of rowdy people can lead to being shoved or pushed causing injuries.  

You can try your best to keep to yourself with the people you’re with, but it is practically inevitable that you will find yourself side by side with strangers. When you find yourself in a predicament, make sure you remain aware of your surroundings and even more cautious of people, things, and potential dangers around you. 

Helping Others And New York’s Good Samaritan Law 

When you’re going to be around a lot of people with alcohol free-flowing, you will likely see someone that has had too much to drink. If you ever fear that someone else is in danger or see an intoxicated party-goer getting behind the wheel, New York has enacted a 911 Good Samaritan Law that will allow you to contact police without fear of retribution. This can help prevent accidents, injuries, and death. 

Under most circumstances, this law provides that even if you are in possession of alcohol, you will not be charged for notifying police of someone that may be in peril. This law came into effect to encourage people to help others without fear of being charged with alcohol possession when they are trying to help someone. 

Contact Us 

If you are injured due to the negligence of another person, The O’Brien Law Firm offers free, no obligation consultations. Personal injuries can be stressful, but you can count on us to help you receive the compensation required for your expenses endured following an injury. Call us today: (716) 907-7777. 

Who Can Sue For Premise Liability 

Private Property, No Trespassing SignHave you ever had children trespass on your property and felt like an unfriendly neighbor for telling them they can no longer ride their bikes or ATVs there? While you might think you’re nagging them, you are actually protecting yourself from liability because if one of them falls and gets injured on your property, you could potentially be sued. Property ownership requires some upkeep and, in some cases, even routine inspections to make sure the premises are safe. 

Invitees 

People who are considered to have invitee status in premise liability are typically people visiting business locations such as restaurants, grocery stores, or department stores. Invitees are usually on the property for the property owner’s financial gain rather than a friendly social visit. They can also be people in public places such as parks and sidewalks because of their implied invitation to lawfully be there. 

Owners that invite people onto their business premises owe people the duty of care to maintain the premises so that they are safe and additionally repair any hazardous conditions. Whether an invitee slips and falls on a food item at a grocery store or is injured by broken equipment in a park, these lawsuits entail figuring out how reasonable it would have been for the owner to foresee the harm and whether he or she knew or should have known about the dangerous condition. 

Licensees 

Licensees are people invited to visit a location for social purposes. These people include friends or family that visit someone’s home for a party or holiday gathering. Property owners owe licensees a duty of care to inform them about any known dangers on the premises that are not obvious to the licensee. For example, lawsuits involving this liability can arise when a homeowner knows about a condition on their property that could potentially be dangerous to his or her guests and does not warn about it. 

Trespassers 

Trespassers are people who are on another’s property uninvited and/or no longer welcomed. The least amount of duty of care is owed to trespassers. However, property owners are always prohibited from setting up dangerous traps that could injure or kill someone by trespassing onto their property. While it is more difficult for a trespasser to successfully sue (as opposed to someone who was lawfully on the property), there have been some successful cases.  

Traditionally, homeowners do not need to warn trespassers of dangerous conditions. However, once a homeowner discovers a trespasser and fails to ask him or her to leave, a higher duty of care will be owed. Furthermore, a property owner can likely be held liable if a child is injured by a dangerous condition on the property, whether or not the child was invited. This “attractive nuisance doctrine” protects children and could include a slippery artificially rocked pond that a reasonable adult would know is dangerous, but a child would not. 

Contact Us 

If you are injured on someone else’s property or need advice about someone injured on your own property, call The O’Brien Law Firm so we can confidentially discuss what happened. We are one call away and ready to help at (716) 907-7777.