The Special Dangers of Head-on Collisions

Two Car Head-on Collisions

Head-on collisions are one type of car crash.  The term “head-on collision” refers to crashes where the point of impact is in the front of the car.  For two car head-on collisions, this refers to both cars’ impact point in the front of the vehicle.  Head-on collisions are more likely to occur on roads with narrow lanes, where there is high traffic volume, where there is no separation of lanes between the different directions of traffic, and on sharp curves.   Head-on collisions also commonly occur when one driver passes without providing enough room to get back into their own lane before completing the pass.

As one might imagine, the risk of death and severe injury, as well as property damage, increases as the speed of the vehicles increases.  People who don’t wear seat belts tend to sustain more injuries and more serious injuries than people who do wear seat belts.  Without a seat belt, the risk of ejection from the vehicle at the time of impact increases substantially.  Ejection can lead to greater injuries.  In 2015, head-on crashes were responsible for 10 % of all fatal crashes.

Single Car Head-on Collisions

Head-on collisions can also occur in single car crashes, such as when a car veers off the roadway and hits a stop sign, traffic light, street light, guardrail, or a building.  As with two car head-on collisions, a single car head-on collision increases in severity as speed increases.  Single car head-on collisions frequently occur when a driver is distracted.  Additionally, falling asleep behind the wheel can lead to single car head-on collisions.

Reducing the Likelihood of Head-on Collisions

Studies show medians can reduce head-on collisions by up to 70 percent.  Obviously, drivers have no control over how roads are constructed.  However, if you happen to be on a road with more than one lane of traffic in a single direction, traveling in the right-hand lane reduces the likelihood of a head-on crash.  Additionally, if faced with the choice of hitting another car head on, or hitting a barrier on the side of the road, such as a guard rail or light pole, the stationary object is the safer choice.  This is because the stationary object does not have their own momentum contributing to the accident and subsequent injuries.  Finally, drivers are encouraged to scan the road ahead for hazards.

Common Accident Injuries in Head-on Collisions

Of course, there are any number of types of injuries one might sustain in a head-on crash.  However, due to the nature of the crash, some of the more common injuries include:

  • Traumatic brain injury;
  • Concussion;
  • Whiplash;
  • Neck and back trauma;
  • Lacerations;
  • Contusions;
  • Broken bones; as well as
  • Injuries to internal organs.

If You Have Been Injured in a Head-on Collision

If you have been injured in a head-on collision, you need an advocate on your side, fighting for your rights.  At the O’Brien Firm, our team is with you every step of the way.  From the first time you call, through settlement or verdict, we work with you and your family, making sure we understand your situation, your loss, and the best ways to compensate you for your injuries.  This way, you can focus on healing.  Contact us today for a free consultation at (716) 907.7777.