Trick or Treat Safety

If you have young children, they are probably already planning what to wear for Halloween.  Some parents opt to forego traditional trick-or-treating in favor of parties, haunted house tours, or one-location trick-or-treat events. For those who opt for the traditional trick-or-treating, here are some ways to help make it a fun and safe experience.

Costume Choices

  • Make sure to check the length and fit of children’s costumes before they go out. Costumes that are too long or too loose may restrict a child’s movement or may be a tripping hazard.
  • If cold weather is anticipated, long underwear and other layers can keep a child warm while not spoiling the look of their costume.
  • Face paint is more comfortable than a mask and allows for unrestricted vision.
  • If the costume is dark in color, make sure to sew or pin some reflective material on the costume so that your child can be seen by drivers.
  • If your child’s costume includes any type of weapon, make sure it is obvious from a distance that the weapon is not real. This is especially important for older children, who could be mistaken for an intruder in the dark. For maximum safety, any costume piece that resembles a firearm should be avoided.

Precautions

Furthermore, children should carry a flashlight after dark. Children should also be instructed not to approach any house that does not have a sign, porch light, or other indication that the occupants are participating in trick-or-treat. Despite the name, “trick-or-treat,” children should be instructed not to play any pranks on non-participating neighbors.  A frightened homeowner may mistake a child for a burglar, to disastrous ends, or the prankster might encounter an aggressive or overly protective pet.

 

Supervision

 While very young children are happy to trick-or-treat with their parents, older children prefer some freedom. Parents may give their older children a sense of freedom while still keeping an eye on them by restricting their children to known streets or neighborhoods, and by accompanying them to a location where they can be observed but not escorted. Children should be instructed not to enter any house or building unless their parents know and trust the occupants and have specifically given permission for the child to enter. Lastly, all children should observe the local trick-or-treat hours.

 

The Spoils of the Night

 Despite the numerous urban legends, verified incidents of tampering with Halloween candy are rare. Nevertheless, children should be instructed to bring all candy home before eating it so you can inspect it. Candy that is not in its original packaging, or in packaging that appears damaged, should be discarded.

 

New York Personal Injury Attorneys

 The attorneys and staff at The O’Brien Firm wish your family a safe and happy Halloween. If you or a family member is injured due to someone’s negligence, call us at 716-907-7777 for a free consultation.